An introduction to the social institutions in the united states

The Sociological Perspective This section of the course introduces students to the discipline of sociology, focusing on its history, the questions and scientific methods that characterize it as a field, and what distinguishes it from other social science disciplines. Included in this definition is the ongoing evolution of sociology as a discipline that is both basic science and applied science. Important in this perspective are the elements of sociological practice and possible careers in sociology at all levels of academic preparation. The first two units of the course introduce students to the dynamic interplay between theory and the logic of the scientific method in sociology.

An introduction to the social institutions in the united states

The Sociological Perspective This section of the course introduces students to the discipline of sociology, focusing on its history, the questions and scientific methods that characterize it as a field, and what distinguishes it from other social science disciplines.

Included in this definition is the ongoing evolution of sociology as a discipline that is both basic science and applied science. Important in this perspective are the elements of sociological practice and possible careers in sociology at all levels of academic preparation.

The first two units of the course introduce students to the dynamic interplay between theory and the logic of the scientific method in sociology.

Learners will become aware of the core theoretical perspectives and the process of developing theory.

An introduction to the social institutions in the united states

They will recognize that sociology is a science: The history of sociology is grounded in social and ideological changes in Western Europe and America, specifically the Enlightenment and American pragmatism.

Contributions of classical sociological theorists such as Durkheim, Marx, and Weber are examined in combination with major scholars prominent in the emergence of American sociology. Sociological theory attempts to explain in a coherent manner the varieties of societal organization and of social behaviors.

Students should understand that though it is posed at an abstract level, sociological theory is continually being refined as it is made to confront empirical reality. Students should become familiar with the major sociological approaches --functionalism, conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, exchange theory, and feminist theory -- to the explanation of social life.

With functionalism Durkheim, Parsonsstudents should be aware of the analogy of society to an organism, the assumption of consensus that underlies social life, and ways that society organizes itself to sanction deviance so that it may return to equilibrium. Students should also be aware of the criticisms of functionalism regarding its difficulty in dealing with social change.

Conflict theory Marx, Weber introduces students to the notion that societal stability may come from stable power relations rather than from an underlying consensus.

Students should become aware of the multiplicity of conflicting interests in society as well as how changes in resources may, among other factors, lead to major social change.

The difficulty of conflict theory in predicting precisely where the fissures in a given society are and when they may erupt is a recurring criticism. An inductive, qualitative approach to the understanding of individual and group interaction in a variety of contexts is the common orientation of symbolic interactionists.

Exchange theory Blau, Homans, Coleman brings issues of rational choice to the fore. Students should understand the ways in which relationships of trust and power may develop as people pursue their self-interest. The degree to which exchange theory is relevant largely to interactions among individuals rather than groups and is contextually based in the larger culture should be understood.

College tuition in the United States is the privately borne cost of higher education collected by educational institutions in the United States, excluding the portion that is paid through taxes or from other government funds as supply-side subsidies to colleges and universities, or demand-side subsidies to students, or that is paid from university endowment funds or gifts through scholarships. The Christian Life and Character of the Civil Institutions of the United States [Benjamin F. Morris] on regardbouddhiste.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Benjamin Franklin Morris' book has been out of print for over . Bookmark. College–Level Sociology Curriculum For Introduction to Sociology. Prepared by the American Sociological Association Task Force on a College Level Introduction to Sociology Course. The Course * Summary Course Outline * Course Narrative. The Course. Purpose: The College-Level Sociology course is designed to .

Feminist theory Gilman, Rossi, Millett focuses on the ways that gender systems structure our daily interactions as well as larger systems of power in society. Many feminist theorists focus not only on how patriarchal societies are set up in ways that disadvantage women but on how the effects of patriarchy articulate with other systems of domination, such as class- and race-based domination.

From theories of sexual politics to sociobiology to economic and materialist approaches, feminist theory provides a variety of perspectives on relations of power in society.

Feminist theories differ radically in how they incorporate other approaches to the study of social life. Research Methods Learners will connect the use and construction of theory with the application of diverse research methods to answer sociological questions.

Over the years, philosophers, religious leaders, journalists, and many others have speculated about human society. Students will learn how sociology differs from these other enterprises because sociology applies relevant theories and scientific methods to the study of society.

The methods are not pre-determined; they depend upon the question being asked. Sometimes the endeavor is exploratory; sometimes it is to test a specific theoretical proposition; it is always systematic. Students will learn how the theory-method process develops and uses a strategy that requires stating a clear question or hypothesis, developing data to address the question or test the hypothesis, and then judging whether the question is answered or the hypothesis is supported.

They will learn further that a scientific approach requires that the methods be stated clearly so that other sociologists might repeat the study to confirm the results. Coverage includes both qualitative and quantitative research, basic and applied research contexts as well as review of different methodologies, including survey research, interviewing, participant observation, content analysis, historical and comparative research.

Basic concepts of statistical analysis are also included, along with discussion of probability and measurement. In addition, the course will examine the questions of ethics in research and the role of values in sociological analysis.

The scientific method operates in an ethical context. As such, it does not permit the sociologist to conceal or ignore information that fails to support the hypothesis. It also requires that sociological researchers safeguard the human subjects who are a part of their research. Also included is the use of the internet in research, with a focus on judging the reliability and validity of information found on the internet.

Students will learn how hypotheses are formulated using concepts and relevant sociological theory. To put this hypothesis more concretely, the rate of juvenile delinquency will be higher in low-status neighborhoods and it will be lower in high-status neighborhoods.

The rate of juvenile delinquency can be measured from publicly available information on juvenile convictions and census data on the number of teenagers in a neighborhood.United States - Strengths and weaknesses: The U.S.

economy is marked by resilience, flexibility, and innovation. In the first decade of the 21st century, the economy was able to withstand a number of costly setbacks.

These included the collapse of stock markets following an untenable run-up in technology shares, losses from corporate scandals, the September 11 attacks in , wars in.

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History of Social Welfare in the United States - Social Work - Oxford Bibliographies