Reflecting human values in the digital

Nederlands As digitalisation and smart automation progress, many will see their jobs altered.

Reflecting human values in the digital

This work is protected by copyright and may be linked to without seeking permission. Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically. Please contact mpub-help umich. They had spelled out to me with brutal clarity and in every possible way that I was a worthless human being.

Those who have accepted it are all, without exception, dead. James Baldwin, "My Childhood," a short story.

Reflecting human values in the digital

Truth be told, and no one seeks to tell it more mightily than Toni Morrison, the notion that higher education involves value-free inquiry and the constant pursuit of objective reasoning is patently invalid. All we need do is think about these matters and we must reach the same conclusion as Professor Morrison.

We begin to see as well that human beings have the power to teach wisdom. Not always the easiest of enterprises, the troublesome nature of self-reflection was recognized by John Dewey, who saw that it involves a "willingness to endure a condition of mental unrest and disturbance.

Just as self-reflection is employed in the solving of problems, like the teaching of values and the appreciation of the contexts or frames of knowledge in which problems and experiences arise and come to be resolved and publicized, so too does it move us away from unthinking routines and habit, while opening us to surprise and novelty, possibility, and growth.

According to Dewey, the self-reflective person eventually assesses his or her own action, although not immediately. There was, for Dewey, a period of time in which judgment must be suspended, during which a person assesses his or her action or behavior. In many respects, it is precisely this extended moment of suspended judgment that Professor Morrison instructs us to consider, the better to appreciate the manner in which higher education is both value-laden and value-seeking.

To believe, for example, that any school can exist outside political or ideological realms with their attendant value structures, is to fail to recognize that schools are themselves the embodiment of the existing democratic organism; it is to imagine that schools exist outside the clearly demarcated boundaries of justice.

Said simply, it is a failure to judge thought or action. Such a belief represents a mindless protection against obvious truths, obvious realities. Self-reflection of the sort in which Professor Morrison begs us to engage necessarily becomes part and parcel of the act of our questioning of higher education, our conduct, our conversations with others as well as with ourselves, and ultimately our taking responsibility for our thoughts and actions.

Conversely, through what Dewey warned was the appeal of appetite, sense, caprice, and a focus purely on momentary circumstance, we may be fated to remain forever in the role of audience member, genuinely believing that ideology, caprice, taste, and subjectivity never enter the realms of our inquiry or pedagogy.

Granted, self-reflection takes time and practice. Carried to the extreme, it may even provoke the sensation that one is going mad. According to Dewey, introspection puts people in a constant "state of perplexity, hesitation, doubt," sensations hardly nourishing in the living classroom, if, in fact, a classroom is valued as a safe container of inquiry and character.

Thoughtfulness, not caprice; reflection, not "gut response"; character, not personality; deliberation, not impulse; depth of thought, not reaction time; ethics, not merely "values clarifications," become the words of the day.

The world hangs on our assumptions and conclusions, just as it ought to hang on our character, for character undergirds the unbroken wholeness of life, and, hence, its formation must become one of the habits of education itself. As Dewey put it, "Sometimes slowness and depth of response are intimately connected.

Whatever they say, I suspect that they are frequently conducting their more complicated conversations with themselves, conversations ultimately about whether they are good, and just what it is that makes someone, or certain circumstances, good, right, moral.

It may be the first time in their lives that they have undertaken such disciplined and undisciplined "study.

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They seek proof of what they are doing and what they are, or at least justifiable rationales for their actions and being. All too often, they feel obliged to generate an answer to that frightful question: What do you do to justify your existence? Adolescents may act or think because someone told them to, or act in a particular manner merely because it has become thoughtless habit.

A number of academic and industrial researchers participated in a workshop, held in Seville, Spain in March, , to present their views and discuss issues that were essential for the future of human-computer interaction (HCI). The participants participated in the workshop, entitled 'HCI in HCI experts must broaden the field’s scope and adopt new methods to be useful in 21st-century sociotechnical environments. HCI experts must broaden the field’s scope and adopt new methods to be useful in 21st-century sociotechnical environments.

In great measure because of their teachers, or more precisely the character of their teachers, they are able to become mindful, thoughtful, critical, self-examining, self- reflective, moral. As Rollo May noted, "Man is the particular being who has to be aware of himself, be responsible for himself, if he is to become himself.

And herein the critical point from Dewey that for a moment marries him in thought to Professor Morrison: Education has accordingly not only to safeguard an individual against the besetting erroneous tendencies of his own mind—its rashness, presumption, and preferences of what chimes with self-interest to objective evidence—but also to undermine and destroy the accumulated and self-perpetuating prejudices of long ages.

The proposition is as axiomatic as saying that genuine democracies allow us to make decisions about ourselves. The mere admonition, "Please, children, only one person can speak at a time," teaches values and, in not a small manner, character. Respect for the child tends to prepare for the responsible adult, in part by containing impulses toward violence.

Surely we appreciate these truisms. None of us, moreover, as teachers, would ever fall into the intellectual abyss recently sketched by Alan Ryan: It results from the constant exercise of thoughtfulness, logic, careful reasoning, or the positive habits of the mind which ideally are taught and nourished in schools, that is to say, by teachers.

Which brings me to one last admonition regarding reflective thinking from Dewey, one last intellectual marriage bond with Morrison that seems worth dwelling upon in a discussion of teaching values in classrooms:A number of academic and industrial researchers participated in a workshop, held in Seville, Spain in March, , to present their views and discuss issues that were essential for the future of human-computer interaction (HCI).

Reflecting human values in the digital

The participants participated in the workshop, entitled 'HCI in voted for a more human values based culture for the future, instead of the rational, more cognitive values we have been embracing and fostering for many years.

So when it comes to the future of work, two trends seem to be coinciding Human value in . Reflecting Human Values in the Digital Age The mission of Human Computer Interaction or better known as HCI is to understand the relationship between human and computers with a goal to improve the current technology design.

Reflecting Human Values in the Digital Age The mission of Human Computer Interaction or better known as HCI is to understand the relationship between human and computers with a goal to improve the current technology design.

HCI experts must broaden the field’s scope and adopt new methods to be useful in 21st-century sociotechnical environments. Click on the icons in the digital version to access session reports and additional information. Reflecting on IGF The values at the core of our digital future relate to human values, such as ‘community’, ‘democracy’, ‘trust’.

Reflecting Human Values in the Digital Age | March | Communications of the ACM